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Home / Invasive Species - What's New on NISIC's Site

Invasive Species - What's New on NISIC's Site

See What's New on the NISIC's Web site by using our RSS feed (learn about RSS). Contains items of interest that have been added to our site, in order of most recent post date.

See related information: Invasive Species Resources - What's New
Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source. If you wish to search for species-related resources and use refinements, enter the species name first before selecting the terms.


APHIS Establishes an Oriental Fruit Fly (Bactrocera dorsalis) Quarantine in Santa Clara County, California (Nov 5, 2021)
USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

Effective September 30, 2021, the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) and the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) established an Oriental fruit fly (Bactrocera dorsalis or OFF) quarantine in the San Jose area of Santa Clara County, California. This action is in response to the confirmed detections of six adult male OFF from the San Jose area by CDFA between September 13 and September 24, all from traps in various types of fruit trees in residential areas. By October 4, CDFA confirmed the seventh male OFF in the vicinity of the earlier finds, which expanded the quarantine further. The establishment of this quarantine area is reflected on the APHIS website, which contains a description of all current Federal fruit fly quarantine areas.

Post Date: Nov 11, 2021
APHIS Issues Supplemental Environmental Assessment for the Spotted Lanternfly Program (Nov 8, 2021)
USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has completed a supplemental environmental assessment (EA) required under the National Environmental Policy Act for its spotted lanternfly program. The previous EA for the spotted lanternfly program was finalized in June 2020 and included control and monitoring activities in the mid-Atlantic Region, Kentucky, North Carolina, and Ohio.

The spotted lanternfly may occur on a variety of plant species, including tree-of-heaven, grapevine, stone fruits (apricot, cherry, nectarine, peach, and plum), and other tree species (apple, oak, pine, poplar, and walnut). If allowed to spread, this pest may be harmful to grape, apple, peach, stone fruit, and logging industries. APHIS is publishing the supplemental EA at https://www.regulations.gov/ and on the APHIS website (PDF | 2.5 MB).

Post Date: Nov 11, 2021
New Study by UM Biological Station and USGS Researchers Reveals How Invasive Species Affect Native Food Webs (Nov 1, 2021)
University of Montana. Flathead Lake Biological Station.

Invasive species cause biodiversity loss and about $120 billion in annual damages in the U.S. alone. Despite plentiful evidence showing that invasive species can change food webs, how invaders disrupt food webs and native species through time has remained unclear. Now, thanks to a collaborative study conducted by researchers representing the University of Montana's Flathead Lake Biological Station (FLBS), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks, there is new insight into how invasive species progressively affect native food webs.

Post Date: Nov 06, 2021
Fighting the Tegu Spread, Protecting Florida’s Wildlife, Natural Areas Through Sustained Multiagency Effort (Nov 2, 2021)
University of Florida. IFAS Extension.

Argentine black and white tegus have spread and established populations in and around Florida at a rapid and growing rate demonstrating critical implications for native wildlife, numerous natural areas, and even restoration efforts for Everglades National Park. UF scientists at the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) and partnering agencies have co-authored the “Growth and Spread of the Argentine Black and White Tegu Population in Florida” illustrating the depth and breadth of the tegu problem. The comprehensive fact sheet details the invasion of the species, the tegu population’s increase, impacts for wildlife and natural areas at stake, interagency goals and efforts to reduce the threat, and the implications of species expansion.

Post Date: Nov 06, 2021
CABI Highlights Top 20 Crop Pests and Diseases for Possible Prioritization in the Eastern Caribbean (Sep 20, 2021)
CAB International. Invasives Blog.

CABI has highlighted the top 20 crop pests and diseases for possible prioritization in the Eastern Caribbean as part of a special presentation given to the Caribbean Plant Health Directors Forum (CPHD) aimed at strengthening food security in the region and further afield. Dr Yelitza Colmenarez, CABI’s Centre Director, Brazil, told the conference of CPHD – with the participation of key partners including the FAO, IICA, OIRSA, USDA-APHIS, CIRAD, CARDI, CAHFSA and CABI Member Countries from the Caribbean – that the introduction of new pest and pathogen species are a serious threat to food security within the Organisation of Eastern Caribbean States (OECS) and globally. With the help of a range of CABI tools and platforms, including the Crop Protection Compendium, Invasive Species Compendium, Horizon Scanning Tool and Pest Risk Analysis Tool, Dr. Colmenarez says 20 key insects, bacteria, fungus and viruses pose a particular threat that needs to be identified, monitored and mitigated.

Post Date: Nov 05, 2021
COP26: Climate Change and Its Impact on Invasive Species (Nov 2, 2021)
CAB International. Invasives Blog.

Climate change is having an important influence on invasive species. The increase in temperatures, rainfall, humidity and drought can facilitate their spread and establishment, creating new opportunities for them to become invasive. For additional information, see the following CABI resources:

Post Date: Nov 04, 2021
Tree-Killing Pests Across the United States Are Increasing the Threats of Climate Change (Oct 19, 2021)
Nature Conservancy.

Insects and diseases that are damaging and killing trees across the contiguous United States are reducing the ability of the nation's forests to capture and store climate-changing carbon dioxide, according to a new study. The study – published in the journal Frontiers in Forests and Global Change – found that forests damaged by insects sequestered 69% less carbon than undamaged forests. Those affected by disease sequestered 28% less carbon. In total, the study found that the damage currently being caused by insects and diseases across the contiguous US is reducing the sequestration potential of America’s forests by roughly 50 million tons of carbon dioxide each year – the equivalent of emissions from more than 10 million cars.

Post Date: Oct 31, 2021
Minnesota DNR and Partner Agencies to Continue Innovative Search for Invasive Carp (Oct 22, 2021)
Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.

Beginning Monday, Oct. 25, the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources will lead a second intensive invasive carp removal effort in Pool 8 of the Mississippi River near La Crosse, Wis. Thirty-four silver carp were captured in Pool 8 during the first interagency carp removal operation in April. The innovative Modified Unified Method (MUM) combines netting and herding techniques to drive and concentrate invasive carp from a large area of water into a small zone for removal. The DNR is conducting this work in partnership with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Anglers are reminded that invasive carp captures must be reported to the DNR immediately. Call 651-587-2781 or email invasivecarp.dnr@state.mn.us. Take a photo and transport the carp to the nearest DNR fisheries office or arrange for it to be picked up by a DNR official.

Post Date: Oct 29, 2021
To Deal With The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, ARS Scientists Bring In Its Arch Enemy (Oct 2021)
USDA. ARS. Tellus.

A tiny wasp may be the solution for managing an agricultural pest causing major economic damage to fruit, vegetable, and field crops in North America and Europe. Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists are currently studying Trissolcus japonicus, commonly known as the samurai wasp, to see if this parasitoid wasp is the right biological control agent for reducing brown marmorated stink bug (Halyomorpha halys) (BMSB) populations outside of Asia. Biological control is the process of reducing or mitigating pests or pathogens by using the pest’s or pathogen’s natural enemies. The samurai wasp is a known natural enemy for the BMSB in Asia, and researchers are understanding how it behaves in non-native environments.

Post Date: Oct 29, 2021
Interior Announces $4.1 Million to Fight the Brown Tree Snake on Guam (Oct 14, 2021)
DOI. Office of Insular Affairs.

The U.S. Department of the Interior's Office of Insular Affairs (OIA) has announced $4,095,922 million in Brown Tree Snake Control program fiscal year (FY) 2021 funding as administered through the Technical Assistance Program. An additional amount of $1,791,421 from Coral Reef and Natural Resources FY 2021 funds was also announced earlier this year for the purpose of controlling and mitigating other invasive species in the Insular Areas besides the brown tree snake. "Islands are particularly vulnerable to invasive species that disrupt natural, long-standing biological processes and threaten our unique, island eco-systems," said Deputy Assistant Secretary Keone Nakoa. "Each year, OIA provides significant funds to critical efforts seeking to help restore balance."

The Brown Tree Snake Control program FY 2021 funding was divided among several governments and federal partners to include Guam, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), Hawai'i, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), and the Department of the Interior. For more information about OIA funds provided to counter invasive species visit: https://www.doi.gov/oia/coral-reef-and-natural-resources-initiative.

Post Date: Oct 22, 2021