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Home / Invasive Species - What's New on NISIC's Site

Invasive Species - What's New on NISIC's Site

See What's New on the NISIC's Web site by using our RSS feed (learn about RSS). Contains items of interest that have been added to our site, in order of most recent post date.

See related information: Invasive Species Resources - What's New
Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source. If you wish to search for species-related resources and use refinements, enter the species name first before selecting the terms.


IMO-Norad Project to Demonstrate Solutions for Greenhouse Gases and Biosafety (Dec 14, 2021)
International Maritime Organization.

A newly signed project is set to provide pilot projects in developing countries in order to demonstrate technical solutions for biofouling management, address the transfer of invasive aquatic species and help reduce greenhouse gas emissions from ships. Biofouling is the accumulation of aquatic organisms on wetted or immersed surfaces such as ships and other offshore structures.

The project complements the existing Global Environment Facility (GEF)/United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)/IMO GloFouling Partnerships Project, which aims to support its lead partnering and partnering countries to implement IMO's Biofouling Guidelines (PDF | 134 KB).

Post Date: Dec 21, 2021
USDA Announces Plan to Integrate Climate Adaptation Into its Missions and Programs (Oct 7, 2021)
United States Department of Agriculture.

As part of President Biden’s whole-of-government approach to confronting the climate crisis, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) released its climate adaptation and resilience plan describing how USDA will prepare for current and future impacts of climate change. The Adaptation Plan is aligned with a renewed and broad effort across USDA to prioritize climate action and increase resilience to climate impacts among American producers, landowners, and communities. For details of the plan, see Action Plan for Climate Adaptation and Resilience (Aug 2021; PDF | 813 KB).

Post Date: Dec 21, 2021
APHIS Publishes Environmental Assessment on Release of Lophodiplosis indentata for the Biological Control of Melaleuca (Dec 16, 2021)
USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) to issue permits for the release of the insect Lophodiplosis indentata (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) to biologically control Melaleuca quinquenervia (Myrtaceae) in the continental United States. Based on the environmental assessment and other relevant data, APHIS has reached a preliminary determination that the release of this control agent within the continental United States will not have a significant impact on the environment.

The proposed action is intended to reduce the severity of environmental damage to wetlands from the invasive Melaleuca tree in the continental United States. Melaleuca is native to Australia, New Caledonia, and Papua New Guinea and was imported into Florida in the late 19th century. It has since established in Florida’s wetlands, dramatically disrupting normal water, fire, disturbance recovery, and nutrient cycles—as well as impacting the amount of light available to other plants. APHIS is making the environmental assessment available to the public for review and comment. All comments received on or before Jan. 16, 2022 will be considered. To review the environmental assessment and make comments: Go to www.regulations.gov and enter APHIS-2021-0049 in the Search field.

Post Date: Dec 17, 2021
APHIS Establishes Citrus Greening (Huanglongbing) Quarantines in Alabama (Dec 8, 2021)
USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

Effective immediately, the USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), in cooperation with the Alabama Department of Agriculture and Industries (ADAI), is establishing quarantines for Huanglongbing (HLB; citrus greening), caused by Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, in all of Baldwin and Mobile Counties in Alabama. APHIS is taking this action because of HLB detections in plant tissue samples collected in multiple locations in Alabama.

APHIS is applying safeguarding measures on the interstate movement of regulated articles from the quarantined counties in Alabama. These measures parallel the intrastate quarantine that ADAI established on June 2, 2020. This action is necessary to prevent the spread of HLB to non-infested areas of the United States.

Post Date: Dec 11, 2021
Pacific Islands Marine Bioinvasions Alert Network (PacMAN) Project Officially Launches (Dec 7, 2021)
University of the South Pacific.

The Pacific Islands Marine Bioinvasions Alert Network (PacMAN) Project, which aims to monitor and identify marine biological invasive alien species, was officially inaugurated on November 24 in collaboration with the Institute of Applied Sciences at The University of the South Pacific (USP-IAS).

USP-IAS Acting Director, Dr Isoa Korovulavula stated it was a significant occasion as they moved collaboratively to a new "frontier" of protecting the local marine environment from invasive species. "The PacMAN Project is expected to boost local capability for early identification and warning of maritime invasive alien species. We are using revolutionary technology, such as DNA metabarcoding, to identify and deal with marine invasive alien species in our local marine environment," he explained.

Post Date: Dec 10, 2021
California Invasive Plant Council - Stewarding California’s Biodiversity: Early Detection and Rapid Response (EDRR) for Invasive Plants (2020)
California Invasive Plant Council.

This white paper describes the strategic advantages of an EDRR approach, puts the need for such an approach in context, and provides a suite of recommendations for action at the statewide level for California.

Post Date: Dec 08, 2021
Government of Canada Invests $14.7M in Conservation Projects in Five Mountain National Parks to Prevent and Manage Aquatic Invasive Species (Dec 4, 2021)
Parks Canada.

On December 4, the Minister of Environment and Climate Change and Minister responsible for Parks Canada, the Honourable Steven Guilbeault, announced federal investments of $14.7 million over the next five years for conservation projects to prevent and manage aquatic invasive species in Banff, Jasper, Kootenay, Waterton Lakes and Yoho national parks.

The mountain national parks are particularly vulnerable to aquatic invasive species due to the high amount of water recreationists who visit each year. Aquatic invasive species alter aquatic ecosystems, cause irreversible damage, impact vulnerable species at risk, and spread downstream beyond park boundaries through the interconnected river systems. Of particular concern for the mountain national parks are invasive mussels, which deplete available nutrients and in turn affects the entire food web by altering water chemistry and quality, as well as the parasite that causes whirling disease, which leads to skeletal deformities for native species. This investment will help address major threats to aquatic ecosystems by funding programs to prevent and educate against the spread of aquatic invasive species.

Post Date: Dec 05, 2021
APHIS Removes the Federal Domestic Quarantine for Light Brown Apple Moth (Epiphyas postvittana) and Interstate Movement Restrictions (Dec 3, 2021)
USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

Effective December 17, 2021, the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) is removing the light brown apple moth (LBAM), Epiphyas postvittana, quarantine in California and Hawaii. APHIS is reclassifying LBAM as a non-quarantine pest, removing all areas under quarantine, and removing movement restrictions on LBAM host material.

When APHIS first confirmed detections of LBAM in the United States in 2007, the best science available indicated that this moth would be a pest of economic significance. In response, APHIS and the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) developed an eradication program. Over time, however, it became clear that the moth’s impact was not as significant as expected.

Post Date: Dec 04, 2021
Using Data to Tackle the Dangerous Mail Pest Pathway (Feb 26, 2021)
USDA. APHIS. Plant Protection Today.

The PPQ Mail Interception Dashboard can filter data to show where illegal shipments have been intercepted in the past and plot the locations across the United States. The dashboard will help us to better understand where violations are located; what products are being imported, from where, and how often; and the pathways that illegal packages travel to the United States.

Post Date: Dec 02, 2021
United States Register of Introduced and Invasive Species (US-RIIS) (Nov 30, 2021)
DOI. United States Geological Survey.

Introduced (non-native) species that becomes established may eventually become invasive, so tracking introduced species provides a baseline for effective modeling of species trends and interactions, geospatially and temporally.

The United States Register of Introduced and Invasive Species (US-RIIS) is comprised of three lists, one each for Alaska, Hawaii, and the conterminous United States. Each list includes introduced (non-native), established (reproducing) taxa that: are, or may become, invasive (harmful) in the locality; are not known to be harmful there; and/or have been used for biological control in the locality.

To be included in the US-RIIS, a taxon must be non-native everywhere in the locality and established (reproducing) anywhere in the locality. Native pest species are not included. The US-RIIS builds on a previous dataset, A Comprehensive List of Non-Native Species Established in Three Major Regions of the U.S.: Version 3.0 (Simpson et al., 2020).

See also: You can access species occurrence data for the United States and U.S. Territories via the new pilot implementation of the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF-US) data portal.
Note: GBIF-US was formerly hosted at BISON.USGS.gov.
The existing BISON website was taken down on December 17, 2021, at which time users are now redirected to www.gbif.us.

An Open-File Report 2018-1156, 15 p., related to the predecessor of the US-RIIS: https://doi.org/10.3133/ofr20181156.

Post Date: Dec 02, 2021