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Home / Invasive Species - What's New on NISIC's Site

Invasive Species - What's New on NISIC's Site

See What's New on the NISIC's Web site by using our RSS feed (learn about RSS). Contains items of interest that have been added to our site, in order of most recent post date.

See related information: Invasive Species Resources - What's New
Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source. If you wish to search for species-related resources and use refinements, enter the species name first before selecting the terms.


Asian Carp Regional Coordinating Committee Releases 2021 Asian Carp Action Plan (Mar 22, 2021)
Invasive Carp Regional Coordinating Committee.

The Asian Carp Regional Coordinating Committee announced the release of its 2021 Asian Carp Action Plan, a comprehensive portfolio of projects focused on Great Lakes protection.

Post Date: Jul 26, 2021
Researchers Discover Undocumented Crayfish Species in Kansas (Jul 21, 2021)
Kansas Department of Wildlife & Parks.

Widespread sampling for invasive crayfish had never occurred in Kansas lakes – that is, until the Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks (KDWP) recently funded a university project focused on the freshwater crustacean. KDWP's Aquatic Nuisance Species Program and Ecological Services section funded the project with the overarching goal of establishing sampling protocols that could then be used for long-term monitoring of both native and invasive crayfish in Kansas. During capturing efforts at McPherson State Fishing Lake – one of several small waterbodies slated to be inspected in the state – university researchers collected multiple Rusty Crayfish. Rusty Crayfish have not previously been documented in the wild in Kansas, making this official "discovery" the first of its kind.

Anglers, boaters and watersport enthusiasts are encouraged to keep their eyes open for this invasive species, which can be identified by its trademark large, black-tipped claws and rust-colored spots on its upper shell. If one is discovered, freeze it in a sealed plastic bag, note the date and location of capture, and contact KDWP's Emporia Research and Survey Office at (620) 342-0658.

Post Date: Jul 24, 2021
Prevention is Key: Lessons from Laurel Wilt (Jul 22, 2021)
USDA. FS. Southern Research Station. CompassLive.

Since 2002, forests in the southeastern U.S. have struggled against a disease called laurel wilt. In 18 years, laurel wilt has spread to 11 southeastern states and killed hundreds of millions of trees. A review article by USDA Forest Service scientist Rabiu Olatinwo reflects on the origins and spread of laurel wilt throughout the last several years. Olatinwo, a research plant pathologist at the SRS, published this research with recently retired plant pathologist Stephen Fraedrich and research entomologist Bud Mayfield in the journal Forests.

Post Date: Jul 24, 2021
Species Profile -- Oak Wilt

Oak Wilt
Oak wilt is a fungal disease of oaks that can rapidly kill susceptible species (particularly red oaks). The origin and means of the introduction of oak wilt are unknown. The disease was first discovered in 1942 and is currently only found in the U.S., but it may have originated in Mexico, Central America, or South America.

Post Date: Jul 20, 2021
Invasive Seaweed Found in Newport Bay (Apr 22, 2021)
California Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Multiple federal, state and local agencies have been notified of an invasive algae species discovered in Newport Bay, California. The algae, which is native to Florida and other subtropical and tropical locales, is scientifically known as Caulerpa prolifera. It can grow quickly, choking out native seaweeds and potentially harming marine life through lost habitat.

A similar species of invasive algae, Caulerpa taxifolia, was identified in California in 2000 and was successfully eradicated through a comprehensive joint local, state and federal effort in 2006. Due to the similarity between these two species, scientists believe this algae species may pose a serious threat to our local coastal ecosystems.

However, it is imperative that the public avoid contact with the plant due to its extreme ease of recolonizing from just tiny fragments. If you believe you have seen this invasive algae, please complete a Suspect Invasive Species Sighting Report: Invasive Algae - Caulerpa prolifera. Please do not collect a specimen, as this may lead to further spread.

Post Date: Jul 19, 2021
Species Profile -- Palmer Amaranth

Palmer amaranth
Palmar amaranth is native to Southwestern U.S. and was first reported outside of its native range in Virginia in 1915, but was not a significant weed in the Southeast until the 1990s. This species is one of the most economically important weeds of corn, cotton, and soybean; some populations are resistant to glyphosate and other herbicides.

Post Date: Jul 19, 2021
Invasive Silver Carp Found in Texas Waters; Anglers Urged to Prevent Bait Bucket Transfers (Jul 15, 2021)
Texas Parks and Wildlife Department.

The Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (TPWD) received a report in late June that an invasive silver carp had been spotted in Choctaw Creek, a Texas tributary of the Red River approximately 15 miles downstream from Lake Texoma. "These are the first reports of silver carp from Texas waters, although they have previously been found in other areas of the Red River including just downstream from Lake Texoma in Oklahoma waters in 2019," said Dan Bennett, TPWD fisheries management biologist. "Invasive carp pose a significant risk to Lake Texoma’s ecosystem and boaters and there is adequate flow and upstream river area for them to become established and reproduce in the lake if introduced."

Anyone who catches either silver or bighead carp in Texas waters is asked to report the sighting with location information and photos to AquaticInvasives@tpwd.texas.gov. Silver and bighead carp are prohibited exotic species in Texas and must be killed upon possession by beheading, gutting, gill-cutting or other means or placed on ice. Neither species can be possessed live.

Post Date: Jul 17, 2021
APHIS Publishes Environmental Assessment on Release of Ganaspis brasiliensis for the Biological Control of Spotted-Wing Drosophila (Jul 16, 2021)
USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

APHIS has prepared an environmental assessment for permitting the release of the insect Ganaspis brasiliensis for the biological control of spotted-wing Drosophila (Drosophila suzukii) in the continental United States. Based on the environmental assessment (EA) and other relevant data, the agency has reached a preliminary determination that the release of this control agent within the continental United States will not have a significant impact on the environment. The proposed action is intended to reduce the severity of damage to small fruit crops from infestations of spotted-wing Drosophila (SWD) in the continental United States. SWD is native to East Asia and was first detected in the United States in California in 2008. It has since established in most fruit-growing regions in North America.

APHIS is making the environmental assessment available to the public for review and comment. All comments received on or before August 16, 2021 will be considered. To review the environmental assessment and make comments, go to www.regulations.gov.

Post Date: Jul 17, 2021
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Clamps Down on the Illegal Mitten Crab Trade (Jun 23, 2021)
DOI. Fish and Wildlife Service.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced the completion of Operation Mitten Catcher, an international law enforcement investigation that prevented the illegal import of approximately 15,525 live Chinese mitten crabs into the U.S. Operation Mitten Catcher is the second national inspection operation initiated by the Service’s Wildlife Inspection Interdiction Team. The team consists of seasoned Service law enforcement professionals who are committed to closing international wildlife trafficking pathways, generating intelligence and coordinating national wildlife inspection efforts.

If you suspect someone is illegally importing live mitten crabs or any other species, please call the Service’s wildlife trafficking tips line at 1-844-FWS-TIPS (397-8477) or email fws_tips@fws.gov. You might be eligible for a financial reward if your tip helps solve a case. Learn more about how to report wildlife crimes.

Post Date: Jul 16, 2021
Mussel boats #35 and #36 intercepted at watercraft inspection stations (Jun 28, 2021)
Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks.

On Sunday, June 27, watercraft inspection stations in eastern Montana intercepted two boats entering the state carrying invasive mussels, making it the 35th and 36th mussel-fouled boats intercepted this year. This surpasses the total number of 35 mussel-fouled boats intercepted in 2020.

Fish, Wildlife & Park staff reminds anyone transporting motorized or nonmotorized boats into Montana that an inspection is required before launching, and stopping at ALL open watercraft inspection stations is required. Failing to stop at an inspection station can result in a fine of up to $500. Many residents of western states, including Montana, are buying boats out of the Midwest or southwestern U.S., where invasive mussels are common. The record number of interceptions is a reminder for people purchasing boats from other states to clean, drain and dry the vessel.

Post Date: Jul 12, 2021