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Species Lists

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Provides lists and information for species declared invasive, noxious, prohibited, or otherwise harmful or potentially harmful. Information is organized by geographical location, covering the U.S.

In the U.S., there are many Federal agencies and State agencies involved with regulating invasive species, and there is not an accepted standard for regulating all types of invasive species in all geographic areas.

We have included the following resources for information purposes only and should not be considered complete, or legally binding. Please note resources we include may not have current information based on the current regulations. For further information pertaining to actual regulations, please refer directly to the regulating agencies as each State has different statutes and administrative rules that may dictate its role in the management of invasive species. See Species Lists + Laws and Regulations to find related legal resources.

Regional Lists

State Lists

Select a state, or choose from the list of states below the map, or view multistate lists.

 

 

Spotlights

DOI. United States Geological Survey.

Introduced (non-native) species that becomes established may eventually become invasive, so tracking introduced species provides a baseline for effective modeling of species trends and interactions, geospatially and temporally.

The United States Register of Introduced and Invasive Species (US-RIIS) is comprised of three lists, one each for Alaska, Hawaii, and the conterminous United States. Each list includes introduced (non-native), established (reproducing) taxa that: are, or may become, invasive (harmful) in the locality; are not known to be harmful there; and/or have been used for biological control in the locality.

To be included in the US-RIIS, a taxon must be non-native everywhere in the locality and established (reproducing) anywhere in the locality. Native pest species are not included. The US-RIIS builds on a previous dataset, A Comprehensive List of Non-Native Species Established in Three Major Regions of the U.S.: Version 3.0 (Simpson et al., 2020).

See also: You can access species occurrence data for the United States and U.S. Territories via the new pilot implementation of the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF-US) data portal.
Note: GBIF-US was formerly hosted at BISON.USGS.gov.
The existing BISON website was taken down on December 17, 2021, at which time users are now redirected to www.gbif.us.

An Open-File Report 2018-1156, 15 p., related to the predecessor of the US-RIIS: https://doi.org/10.3133/ofr20181156.

USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

Based on years of experience and the latest science, APHIS developed a list of 59 pests and diseases that could pose a significant risk to U.S. food and agriculture resources. The list is not meant to be all-encompassing, but rather focus on the most impactful pests and diseases. USDA's goal remains to keep the U.S. free of these foreign pests and diseases.

USDA. APHIS. Plant Protection and Quarantine.

The APHIS Federal Noxious Weed Program is designed to prevent the introduction into the United States of nonindigenous invasive plants.
See also: Noxious Weeds Program Homepage for more information.

USDA. APHIS. Cooperative Agricultural Pest Survey (CAPS). National Agricultural Pest Information System (NAPIS).
Provides State pest detection contacts, recent state exotic pest news, links to state pest resources, and a list of state CAPS survey targets.

Selected Resources

The section below contains highly relevant resources for this subject, organized by source. Or, to display all related content view all resources for Species Lists

Partnership

USDA. APHIS. Cooperative Agricultural Pest Survey (CAPS).

The National CAPS Committee will revise the National Pest Surveillance Guidelines when annually reviewing the policy, strategy, and performance of the CAPS program. The NCC also will approve annually a “Priority Pest List.” This list will include the Commodity and Taxonomic Survey Pests, as well as Pests of Economic and Environmental Importance (OPEP Prioritized List). The Priority Pest List will be based on input by PPQ, the States, Center for Plant Health Science and Technology (CPHST), National Identification Services (NIS), and commodity organizations.

University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health.

Includes invasive species by category for insects, diseases, plants, and animals.
See also: Invasive Species Status Report by Congressional District

National Plant Board.

Provides a combined Federal and State list. Refer to the link to the Excel spreadsheet of information compiled by industry. Please note that State regulations change frequently and may not reflect the most current information.

Federal Government

USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

APHIS created the webpage to make it easier for its customers to find critical information on pests and diseases of concern. With this tool, members of the public will have the information they need to report pests and diseases and together we can protect America’s agriculture and natural resources. This page lists all pest and disease programs managed by APHISas part of its mission to protect American agriculture and natural resources. Users can search by type (plant, animal), keyword (avian, fruit fly, cotton), or by the specific pest or disease (coconut rhinoceros beetle, brucellosis). You can also scroll through the page, which lists the pests and diseases alphabetically and includes a corresponding image.

USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

APHIS developed this list of 59 pests and diseases that could pose a significant risk to U.S. food and agriculture resources. The list is not meant to be all-encompassing, but rather focus on the most impactful pests and diseases. The goal remains to keep the U.S. free of these foreign pests and diseases. Section 12203 of the 2018 Farm Bill requires pest- and disease-planning activities that mirror the extensive planning efforts APHIS already performs. Specifically, it requires APHIS to develop a uniform list of pests and diseases that represent the gravest threat to the U.S. and to develop comprehensive response plans to ensure Federal and State governments are prepared to respond to them.

See also: News Release - APHIS Seeks Feedback on List of Animal and Plant Pest and Disease Threats (Aug 6, 2020) and Clarifications for Stakeholders – Farm Bill Section 12203

DOI. USGS. Wetland and Aquatic Research Center.
Provides fact sheets, maps and collection information for aquatic vertebrates and invertebrates occurring outside of their native range.

USDA. APHIS. Plant Protection and Quarantine.

APHIS regulates the following list of pests under the authority of the Plant Protection Act. It does not include any 'regulated non-quarantine pests' (pests which are present and may be widely distributed in the United States).